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Songs celebrating trees and forests

Songs celebrating trees and forests. Folklore from Scotland. Wales, North America, England and Ireland.

Songs celebrating trees and forests

Some folklore songs celebrating trees and forests

The Trees They Do Grow High

A traditional Scottish folk song that tells the story of a young man who falls in love with a girl, but she is too young for him. The lyrics describe the passing of time, and the growth of trees serves as a metaphor for the girl’s maturation. 

The Trees They Do Grow High” is a traditional Scottish folk song that has been passed down through generations of singers and musicians. The song tells the story of a young woman who falls in love with a boy who is too young for her. The lyrics describe the passing of time, and the growth of trees serves as a metaphor for the girl’s maturation.
The first stanza describes the trees growing high and the leaves growing green, symbolizing the beginning of spring and the promise of new growth. The following stanzas tell the story of the young woman’s love for the boy, despite the warnings of her mother. The final stanza is a warning to other maidens to be careful of young men who may deceive them.
The song is often interpreted as a cautionary tale about the dangers of young love and the importance of being cautious in matters of the heart. The metaphor of the growing trees adds a layer of symbolism to the story, suggesting that the girl is growing and changing over time, just as the trees around her are growing taller and stronger.

The Trees They Do Grow High” is a beautiful and poignant folk song that has endured for centuries. Its timeless message about love and the passage of time continues to resonate with listeners today.

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Lyrics to “The Trees They Do Grow High”

The trees they do grow high, and the leaves they do grow green
Many’s the time I’ve been in love, and many’s the time we’ve been a-partin’
But here’s a health to the oak and the ivy,
Who twine ’round the ruin and smile on the foe!

When I was a young girl, I heard my mother say
That I was a fool to love you, but I’ll tell you right now what I would do
I would watch the birds fly high up in the sky,
And the men down in the valley below

The trees they do grow high, and the leaves they do grow green
Many’s the time I’ve been in love, and many’s the time we’ve been a-partin’
But here’s a health to the oak and the ivy,
Who twine ’round the ruin and smile on the foe!

Oh father, oh father, you’ve done me much harm,
You’ve married me off to a boy that’s too young,
For he’s only sixteen years and I am twenty-one,
And I fear he’s too young to be my wedded husband

The trees they do grow high, and the leaves they do grow green
Many’s the time I’ve been in love, and many’s the time we’ve been a-partin’
But here’s a health to the oak and the ivy,
Who twine ’round the ruin and smile on the foe!

So come all you maidens and listen to me,
Never let a young man a-love you too well,
For it’s oftentimes they will deceive you,
And oftentimes they will slight you as well.

The trees they do grow high, and the leaves they do grow green
Many’s the time I’ve been in love, and many’s the time we’ve been a-partin’
But here’s a health to the oak and the ivy,
Who twine ’round the ruin and smile on the foe!

The Holly and the Ivy

A Christmas carol that celebrates the beauty of the holly and the ivy, two plants that are commonly associated with winter and the holiday season.

“The Holly and the Ivy” is a traditional English Christmas carol that dates back to at least the 17th century. The song tells the story of the holly and the ivy, two plants that are commonly associated with winter and the holiday season.
The first stanza describes the holly and the ivy growing in the winter season, with the holly representing the masculine and the ivy representing the feminine. The following stanzas describe the various symbolic meanings associated with each plant. The holly is said to be a symbol of Christ, with its red berries representing his blood and its prickly leaves representing his crown of thorns. The ivy, on the other hand, is said to be a symbol of the Virgin Mary, with its green leaves representing the hope and eternal life brought by Christ’s birth.
The chorus of the song repeats the lines “Oh, the rising of the sun and the running of the deer,” which are thought to have pagan origins and may have been added to the carol at a later date. The final stanza of the song returns to the theme of the holly and the ivy growing together, suggesting that they represent the unity of Christ and the Virgin Mary.
Overall, “The Holly and the Ivy” is a beautiful and meaningful Christmas carol that celebrates the symbolism of two plants that have long been associated with the winter season. Its combination of Christian and pagan themes makes it a unique and enduring example of English folk music.

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Lyrics to “The Holly and the Ivy”

The holly and the ivy,
When they are both full grown,
Of all the trees that are in the wood,
The holly bears the crown.

Refrain:
Oh, the rising of the sun,
And the running of the deer,
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in the choir.

The holly bears a blossom,
As white as lily flower,
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ,
To be our sweet saviour.

Refrain:
Oh, the rising of the sun,
And the running of the deer,
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in the choir.

The holly bears a berry,
As red as any blood,
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ,
To do poor sinners good.

Refrain:
Oh, the rising of the sun,
And the running of the deer,
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in the choir.

The holly and the ivy,
When they are both full grown,
Of all the trees that are in the wood,
The holly bears the crown.

Refrain:
Oh, the rising of the sun,
And the running of the deer,
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in the choir.

The Ash Grove

A Welsh folk song that praises the beauty of the ash tree and the grove where it grows. The lyrics describe the natural setting and encourage the listener to appreciate the beauty of the forest. 

The Ash Grove” is a traditional Welsh folk song that dates back to the 19th century. The song is named after a grove of ash trees and celebrates the natural beauty of the Welsh countryside.
The first stanza of the song describes the ash grove as a place of natural beauty, with the leaves of the ash trees shimmering in the wind. The following stanzas compare the beauty of the grove to other natural wonders, such as the stars in the sky and the birds in flight. The refrain of the song repeats the lines “Down yonder green valley, where streamlets meander, When twilight is fading, I pensively rove,” suggesting that the speaker is wandering through the countryside, lost in thought.
The final stanza of the song takes a more melancholic tone, as the speaker reflects on the passage of time and the inevitability of death. The line “But sorrow returns with the dawning of morn” suggests that even the beauty of the natural world cannot entirely dispel the sadness and pain of human existence.

The Ash Grove” is a beautiful and haunting folk song that celebrates the natural beauty of the Welsh countryside while acknowledging the sadness and pain that are an inevitable part of life. Its haunting melody and evocative lyrics have made it a beloved classic of the folk music genre.

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Lyrics to “The Ash Grove”

Down yonder green valley where streamlets meander,
When twilight is fading, I pensively rove,
Or at the bright noontide in solitude wander
Amid the dark shades of the lonely ash grove.

Refrain:
‘Twas there by the green grove, that, at dawn’s sweet light,
We twa did meet, and we twa did part;
‘Twas there on that same grove, the sweet vows you broke,
And left me to weep with a broken heart.

‘Twas there on that same grove, that, at dawn’s sweet light,
We twa did meet, and we twa did part;
‘Twas there on that same grove, the sweet vows you broke,
And left me to weep with a broken heart.

Oh, to be lying, oh, deep in yon green valley,
With the sound of the church bell so sweetly o’er me;
Oh, to be lying, oh, deep in yon green valley,
The dark shades of evening would soon close around me.

Refrain:
‘Twas there by the green grove, that, at dawn’s sweet light,
We twa did meet, and we twa did part;
‘Twas there on that same grove, the sweet vows you broke,
And left me to weep with a broken heart.

But sorrow returns with the dawning of morning,
And the voice in my bosom sighs deeply for thee;
Though death were the black spot that forever should part us,
Yet still would I linger, thy true love to be.

Refrain:
‘Twas there by the green grove, that, at dawn’s sweet light,
We twa did meet, and we twa did part;
‘Twas there on that same grove, the sweet vows you broke,
And left me to weep with a broken heart.

The Oak and the Ash and the Bonny Rowan Tree

An English folk song that describes the different trees that grow in the forest and their symbolism. The oak represents strength, the ash represents flexibility, and the rowan tree represents protection.

The Oak and the Ash and the Bonny Rowan Tree” is a traditional English folk song that dates back to at least the 18th century. The song celebrates the beauty of the natural world and the different types of trees that grow in England.
The first stanza of the song describes the oak tree, which is seen as a symbol of strength and longevity. The second stanza celebrates the ash tree, which is known for its beauty and its ability to grow in difficult conditions. The third stanza describes the rowan tree, which is associated with magic and folklore in many parts of the world.
The chorus of the song repeats the lines “And the green leaves they grow rare,” suggesting that the beauty of the natural world is in danger of disappearing or being lost.
Overall, “The Oak and the Ash and the Bonny Rowan Tree” is a celebration of the beauty and diversity of the natural world, and a warning about the need to protect it. Its evocative lyrics and haunting melody have made it a beloved classic of the English folk music genre.

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Lyrics to “The Oak and the Ash and the Bonny Rowan Tree”

The oak and the ash and the bonny rowan tree
They’re all a-growing green in the old country
And the green leaves they grow rare, oh
And the green leaves they grow rare

The oak tree, it is a noble tree
It grows in the west country
And the green leaves they grow rare, oh
And the green leaves they grow rare

The ash tree, it is a bonny tree
It grows in the north country
And the green leaves they grow rare, oh
And the green leaves they grow rare

The bonny rowan tree, it is a lady bright
It bears a berry for a soul’s delight
And the green leaves they grow rare, oh
And the green leaves they grow rare

So all you lads and lasses, wherever you may be
I pray you to the brambles and the blackberry tree
And the green leaves they grow rare, oh
And the green leaves they grow rare

The oak and the ash and the bonny rowan tree
They’re all a-growing green in the old country
And the green leaves they grow rare, oh
And the green leaves they grow rare

The Cherry Tree Carol

A traditional Christmas carol that tells the story of the Virgin Mary and Joseph as they journey to Bethlehem. In the song, Mary asks Joseph to pick cherries from a tree, but he tells her that the tree belongs to the king. Mary then asks the tree to lower its branches so she can pick the cherries, and it does so. The tree is symbolic of the power of nature to provide for those in need.

The Cherry Tree Carol” is a traditional English Christmas carol that tells the story of the Nativity from the perspective of Joseph, the husband of Mary. The carol is thought to date back to the 15th century, and has been performed and recorded by many artists over the years.
The story of the carol is based on an apocryphal text called the Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew, which tells the story of Mary and Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem. According to the text, Joseph and Mary are traveling through a cherry orchard when Mary expresses a desire for some of the cherries. Joseph responds by telling her that it is not the season for cherries, but Mary insists that they will be given to her by the child she carries in her womb.
In the carol, the cherry tree bends down to Mary and offers her its fruit, which Joseph interprets as a sign of the child’s divinity. The refrain of the song repeats the lines “Sing, O my love, O my love, my love, my love, This have I done for my true love,” suggesting that the story is a testament to the power of love and the miracle of the Nativity.
Overall, “The Cherry Tree Carol” is a beautiful and evocative Christmas carol that celebrates the story of the Nativity from a unique perspective. Its haunting melody and timeless message have made it a beloved classic of the Christmas music genre.

Lyrics to “The Cherry Tree Carol”

When Joseph was an old man, an old man was he
He married Virgin Mary, the Queen of Galilee
He married Virgin Mary, the Queen of Galilee

As Joseph and Mary walked through an orchard green
There were cherries and berries as thick as might be seen
There were cherries and berries as thick as might be seen

Then Mary said to Joseph, so meek and so mild
“Joseph, gather me some cherries, for I am with child
Joseph, gather me some cherries, for I am with child”

Then Joseph flew in anger, in anger flew he
“Let the father of the baby gather cherries for thee
Let the father of the baby gather cherries for thee”

Then up spoke baby Jesus, from in Mary’s womb
“Bend down the tallest branches, that my mother might have some
Bend down the tallest branches, that my mother might have some”

Then bent down the cherry tree, as low as it could be
And Mary gathered cherries, while Joseph stood by she
And Mary gathered cherries, while Joseph stood by she

Then Joseph took Mary all on his right knee
Saying, “Oh, what have I done, love? What have I done to thee?”
Saying, “Oh, what have I done, love? What have I done to thee?”

The cherry tree bowed down low, bowed low to the ground
And Mary bore Jesus Christ, for to save sinners’ souls from hell
And Mary bore Jesus Christ, for to save sinners’ souls from hell

Sing, O my love, O my love, my love, my love
This have I done for my true love
Sing, O my love, O my love, my love, my love
This have I done for my true love

The Greenwood Tree

This traditional English folk song can be found on various folk music albums and online music platforms.

The Greenwood Tree” is a traditional English folk song that celebrates the beauty of the natural world and the joy of living in harmony with nature. The song is thought to date back to the 17th century and has been performed and recorded by many artists over the years.
The first stanza of the song describes the greenwood tree, which is seen as a symbol of the beauty and abundance of nature. The following stanzas celebrate the joys of living in the forest, with references to birds, flowers, and other natural wonders. The refrain of the song repeats the lines “Hey ho, the greenwood tree, / The leaves and the branches are fair to see,” suggesting that the beauty of the natural world is a source of joy and wonder for all who experience it.

The Greenwood Tree” is a beautiful and evocative folk song that celebrates the beauty of the natural world and the joys of living in harmony with it. Its timeless message and haunting melody have made it a beloved classic of the English folk music genre.

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Lyrics to “The Greenwood Tree”

The greenwood tree is fairest of all
In the greenwood branches the birds do call
And in its shade doth the wild deer fall
Hey ho, the greenwood tree

The cuckoo sings in the greening spring
The nightingale doth make the woodlands ring
The mavis and the merle doth sing
Hey ho, the greenwood tree

The bark of the birch is silver white
The hazel’s crown is a pleasing sight
The beech’s shade is the deer’s delight
Hey ho, the greenwood tree

The leaves they fade and turn to brown
The wind doth blow them to the ground
So many years this I have found
Hey ho, the greenwood tree

Hey ho, the greenwood tree
The leaves and the branches are fair to see
Hey ho, the greenwood tree
And it blooms anew in the spring for me

The Lumberjack’s Alphabet

This song was written by folk musician and environmental activist, Pete Seeger, and can be found on his album “American Industrial Ballads.”

The Lumberjack’s Alphabet” is a traditional folk song that was popular among loggers and lumberjacks in North America during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The song consists of a series of rhyming couplets that use each letter of the alphabet to describe a different aspect of the lumberjack’s life and work.
The song was likely used as a mnemonic device to help loggers remember the various tools and techniques they needed to use while working in the forest. Each couplet describes a different item or concept related to logging, from the “Axe to grind” to “Zipping logs downstream.”
Despite its practical origins, “The Lumberjack’s Alphabet” has become a beloved classic of the American folk music genre, and has been recorded by many artists over the years. Its simple yet evocative lyrics and catchy melody make it a memorable and enjoyable song to sing and listen to.
Overall, “The Lumberjack’s Alphabet” is a testament to the hard work and ingenuity of the men who worked in the forests of North America, and a celebration of the unique culture and traditions of the lumberjack community.

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Lyrics to “The Lumberjack’s Alphabet”

A is for the axe that’s cutting the tree
B is for the boys who work in the woods with me
C’s for the trees that we fall to the ground
D’s for the dinners that’s had sitting round

Chorus:
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to make the dust fly
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to shake ’em high

E’s for the engine that’s humming away
F’s for the teamster who feeds them all hay
G’s for the go-devil that’s hauling the logs
H’s for the horses, the best in the bogs

Chorus:
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to make the dust fly
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to shake ’em high

I is for the iron wedges that’s splitting the wood
J is for the jumper that’s skidding the logs good
K’s for the kindlings that’s lighted with care
L’s for the lanterns that’s shining out there

Chorus:
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to make the dust fly
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to shake ’em high

M’s for the markers that show us the way
N’s for the nimble feet that’s dancing all day
O’s for the oxen that’s yoked to the chain
P’s for the peavey that’s moving again

Chorus:
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to make the dust fly
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to shake ’em high

Q’s for the quarry where the stones are all split
R’s for the rollways where the logs all hit
S’s for the sawyers who’s sawing all day
T’s for the teamsters who’s hauling away

Chorus:
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to make the dust fly
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to shake ’em high

U’s for the uphill that we’re working each day
V’s for the valleys that’s in our way
W’s for the whiskey that’s keeping us dry
X marks the spot where the money we’ll lie

Chorus:
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to make the dust fly
E-I-E-I-O, we’re the boys to shake ’em high

Y’s for the yard that the logs are all piled
Z’s for the zip that’s taking them wild
Z’s for the zip that’s taking them wild.

The Redwoods

This song was written and performed by folk musician and environmentalist, Kate Wolf, and can be found on her album “Lines on the Paper.”

The Redwoods” is a traditional American folk song that celebrates the beauty and majesty of the redwood trees of California. The song was written in the early 20th century by Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter, a legendary folk musician who is known for his powerful voice and his ability to play a wide range of instruments.
The lyrics of “The Redwoods” describe the awe-inspiring beauty of the towering redwood trees, which are some of the tallest and oldest trees in the world. The song compares the trees to “pillars of the sky,” and suggests that their beauty is a testament to the power and majesty of nature.
Despite its simple lyrics and melody, “The Redwoods” has become a beloved classic of the American folk music genre, and has been recorded by many artists over the years. Its timeless message and evocative imagery have made it a powerful tribute to the beauty and power of the natural world.
Overall, “The Redwoods” is a beautiful and moving folk song that celebrates the beauty and majesty of one of America’s most iconic natural landmarks. Its message of awe and reverence for the natural world continues to resonate with audiences today, making it a timeless classic of the American folk music tradition.

Songs celebrating trees and forests. Folklore from Scotland. Wales, North America, England and Ireland.
Songs celebrating trees and forests. Folklore from Scotland. Wales, North America, England and Ireland.

Lyrics to “The Redwoods”

Redwoods, redwoods, pillars of the sky
Standing tall and silent, living long and high
Redwoods, redwoods, kings of all the land
Glorious and mighty, gentle giants stand

Chorus:
Redwoods, redwoods, reaching for the sky
Lifting up their branches, singing out on high

Redwoods, redwoods, centuries they stand
Guarding ancient secrets, of this wondrous land
Redwoods, redwoods, legends they inspire
Bringing us a message, that we must admire

Chorus:
Redwoods, redwoods, reaching for the sky
Lifting up their branches, singing out on high

Redwoods, redwoods, sacred trees of old
In their peaceful presence, stories will be told
Redwoods, redwoods, mighty forests grand
Nature’s hidden treasures, in this wondrous land

Chorus:
Redwoods, redwoods, reaching for the sky
Lifting up their branches, singing out on high

The Wind in the Willows

This song is based on the book “The Wind in the Willows” by Kenneth Grahame and has been recorded by various folk musicians.

The Wind in the Willows” is a song inspired by the classic children’s book of the same name, written by Kenneth Grahame. The book tells the story of a group of animal friends, including Mole, Rat, Badger, and Toad, who live in the English countryside and have various adventures.
The song “The Wind in the Willows” was written by the folk musician and songwriter, Alan Bell. The lyrics describe the beauty of the natural world and the sense of freedom and adventure that comes from exploring it. The chorus of the song captures this feeling with the repeated line:
The wind in the willows and the birds in the sky,
And a touch of the old magic that glows in the eye
.”
The verses of the song describe the different animals that appear in the book and their various activities. For example, one verse describes Mole as he “digs his way through the earth and the clay,” while another describes Toad’s love of speed and excitement.
Overall, the song celebrates the joy of being in nature and the sense of wonder and adventure that can be found there. It is a beloved classic of the folk music genre and is often sung by groups of children and adults alike.

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Lyrics to the traditional “The Wind in the Willows”

The wind in the willows and the birds in the sky,
And a touch of the old magic that glows in the eye.
Furry little faces, peeping up from the ground,
And a forest all around, all around.

Mole he digs his way through the earth and the clay,
Rat he rows his boat in the bright light of day.
Badger grunts and growls and scratches around,
And Toad, he’s always up to something, in this town.

The wind in the willows and the birds in the sky,
And a touch of the old magic that glows in the eye.
Furry little faces, peeping up from the ground,
And a forest all around, all around.

Otter he splashes through the water so clear,
And the weasel, he sneaks and he creeps ever near.
But the wise old owl up in his tree,
He’s been watching it all and he’ll tell you for free.

The wind in the willows and the birds in the sky,
And a touch of the old magic that glows in the eye.
Furry little faces, peeping up from the ground,
And a forest all around, all around.

So if you’re feeling lonely, just take a little stroll,
Down to the riverbank, where the kingfisher’s goal.
Or take a ride with Toad, and you’ll see,
That the world’s a magical place, for you and me.

The wind in the willows and the birds in the sky,
And a touch of the old magic that glows in the eye.
Furry little faces, peeping up from the ground,
And a forest all around, all around.

The Forest Song

This traditional folk song can be found on various folk music albums and online music platforms. 


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The Cuckoo’s Nest

This traditional folk song has been recorded by various folk musicians and can be found on various folk music albums and online music platforms.

The Cuckoo’s Nest” is a traditional English folk song that dates back to the 18th century. The song celebrates the coming of spring and the return of the cuckoo bird, which was seen as a symbol of new life and renewal. The lyrics of the song describe the beauty of the natural world during the spring, with references to flowers, birds, and other signs of the season.
The song has been recorded by many artists over the years, and has become a beloved classic of the English folk music genre. Its simple yet evocative melody and timeless lyrics have made it a favorite of folk musicians and enthusiasts around the world.
Overall, “The Cuckoo’s Nest” is a beautiful and evocative folk song that celebrates the beauty and vitality of the natural world, and the joy of living in harmony with it. Its enduring popularity is a testament to the power of folk music to capture the spirit of a people and a culture, and to connect us to the world around us.

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Lyrics to “The Cuckoo’s Nest”

In April, come he will,
In May, he sings all day,
In June, he alters his tune,
In July, he prepares to fly,
In August, go he must!

Chorus:
Cuckoo, cuckoo, what do you do?
In April, come he will!

He’ll sing his song the whole day long,
And never change a note,
Till the little ones, in the nest,
Take their first short note.

Chorus:
Cuckoo, cuckoo, what do you do?
In April, come he will!

He’ll sing his song the whole day long,
And never change a word,
Till the little ones, in the nest,
Learn to call like the bird.

Chorus:
Cuckoo, cuckoo, what do you do?
In April, come he will!

So the cuckoo’s song is heard,
When the spring and summer meet,
And the boughs of the may tree,
Are laden with blossoms sweet.

Chorus:
Cuckoo, cuckoo, what do you do?
In April, come he will!

The Water is Wide

This traditional Scottish folk song has been recorded by various folk musicians and can be found on various folk music albums and online music platforms.

The Water Is Wide” is a traditional English and Scottish folk song that has been popular for centuries. The song tells the story of a young man who is separated from his lover by a wide and treacherous river. The lyrics describe the young man’s attempts to cross the river to be with his love, and the many obstacles he faces along the way.
The song has been recorded by many artists over the years, and has become a beloved classic of the folk music genre. Its haunting melody and evocative lyrics have made it a favorite of musicians and enthusiasts around the world.
The origins of “The Water Is Wide” are uncertain, but it is believed to have originated in Scotland or England during the 17th or 18th century. Over time, the song has evolved and been adapted by different cultures and musicians, giving rise to a wide variety of interpretations and arrangements.
Overall, “The Water Is Wide” is a beautiful and moving folk song that speaks to the power of love and the challenges we face in our quest to be with the ones we love. Its enduring popularity is a testament to the power of folk music to connect us to our past, our present, and our shared humanity.

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Lyrics to “The Water Is Wide”

The water is wide, I cannot cross o’er
And neither have I wings to fly
Give me a boat that can carry two
And both shall row, my love and I

A ship there is and she sails the sea
She’s loaded deep as deep can be
But not so deep as the love I’m in
I know not how I sink or swim

Chorus:
Oh love is handsome and love is fine
And love’s a jewel when first it’s new
But love grows old and waxes cold
And fades away like the morning dew

There is a ship and she’s sailing by
It’s laden deep as deep can be
But not so deep as the love I’m in
I know not how I sink or swim

Chorus:
Oh love is handsome and love is fine
And love’s a jewel when first it’s new
But love grows old and waxes cold
And fades away like the morning dew

I leaned my back up against an oak
Thinking it was a trusty tree
But first it bent and then it broke
Thus did my love prove false to me

Chorus:
Oh love is handsome and love is fine
And love’s a jewel when first it’s new
But love grows old and waxes cold
And fades away like the morning dew

The water is wide, I cannot cross o’er
And neither have I wings to fly
Give me a boat that can carry two
And both shall row, my love and I.

The Green Bushes

This traditional English folk song has been recorded by various folk musicians and can be found on various folk music albums and online music platforms.

Green Bushes” is a traditional English folk song that has been popular for centuries. The song tells the story of a young man who falls in love with a beautiful woman and dreams of being with her. The lyrics describe the beauty of the natural world and the joys of love and romance.
The song has been recorded by many artists over the years, and has become a beloved classic of the folk music genre. Its gentle melody and evocative lyrics have made it a favorite of musicians and enthusiasts around the world.
The origins of “Green Bushes” are uncertain, but it is believed to have originated in England during the 18th century. Over time, the song has evolved and been adapted by different cultures and musicians, giving rise to a wide variety of interpretations and arrangements.
Overall, “Green Bushes” is a beautiful and moving folk song that celebrates the power of love and the beauty of the natural world. Its enduring popularity is a testament to the enduring appeal of folk music as a means of expressing the hopes, dreams, and desires of the human heart.

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Lyrics to “Green Bushes”

As I walked out one summer’s morning,
As I walked out one May morning,
I met a young couple a-making hay
And I asked them kindly to pass the time of day.

Chorus:
And sing all the green bushes, oh
All green bushes, oh.

As we were a-walking and talking together,
We courted each other all in the blooming heather.
She says to me, “Will you come to my father’s hall
And drink of his wine, and that’s better for us all?”

Chorus:
And sing all the green bushes, oh
All green bushes, oh.

And when we got to her father’s dwelling,
Her father and mother received me well,
And I being tired, I laid down to rest
And she laid down beside me, I being full blessed.

Chorus:
And sing all the green bushes, oh

All green bushes, oh.
And early next morning before I arose,
She had dressed herself in her man’s clothes.
Saying, “Fare thee well, love, I must go away,
And I do hope I’ll see you again some day.”

Chorus:
And sing all the green bushes, oh
All green bushes, oh.

Songs celebrating trees and forests. Folklore from Scotland. Wales, North America, England and Ireland.
Songs celebrating trees and forests. Folklore from Scotland. Wales, North America, England and Ireland.

Enjoy these songs about trees and forests! And share your favorites with us! πŸ‘‡πŸ‘‡πŸ»πŸ‘‡πŸΌπŸ‘‡πŸ½πŸ‘‡πŸΎπŸ‘‡πŸΏ

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Fleeky One

Fleeky One

Seek to serve humanity in preserving nature. Do not cut or pee the tree

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